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and hamas are discussing lifting the economic blockade that has choked gaza. hamas has managed to win strong support from ordinary palestinians and in neighboring arab countries. this has been achieved in part through its use of the media. nhk world's kohe spds suji reports. >> reporter: israel's bombardment of gaza lasted for eight days and killed over 170 palestinians. a radio station run by hamas remained on air throughout that time and has continued its andy israel broadcasts even since the end of the fight. this is a radio station inside of hamas. in order to tell their side of the story they will do whatever it takes. these children lost close family members in the bombardment. they have been brought in the studio to stoke people's anger and boost support for hamas. >> translator: we're just reporting the reality of the situation. we aren't broadcasting propaganda or trying to scare people. >> reporter: hamas cannot match israel's overwhelming interest. to make up for that, islamic movement hit back during the fighting through a war of words. they released a video claiming to have capt
in the gaza strip. now israel and hamas are discussing lifting the economic blockade that has choked gaza. hamas has managed to win strong support from ordinary palestinians and in neighboring arab countries. this has been achieved in part through its use of the media. nhk world's kohei tsuji reports. >> reporter: israel's bombardment of gaza lasted for eight days and killed over 170 palestinians. a radio station run by hamas remained on air throughout that time and has continued its anti-israel broadcasts even since the end of the fight. this is a radio station related to hamas. in order to tell their side of the story, they will do whatever it takes. these children lost close family members in the bombardment. they have been brought in the studio to stoke people's anger and boost support for hamas. >> translator: we're just reporting the reality of the situation. we aren't broadcasting propaganda or trying to scare people. >> reporter: hamas cannot match israel's overwhelming military strength. to make up for that, the islamic movement hit back during the fighting through a war of words
. wait. that's not right. >>> in 1997 the bur chief of hamas was considered by many including the united states to be a terrorist organization. at the time he was living in exile in jordan and from there he allegedly orchestrated a number of attacks on israel. israel's prime minister was benjamin netanyahu and that year in 1997 he green lit a plan for the intelligence agency to kill mr. mashal. it did not go well. >> as he arrived at work, two suspicious men approached him. >> translator: i was just entering my office when i heard a sound. then i felt an electric shock throughout my body. >> his body guard chased the two men up the street, caught them and beat them. the two insisted they were canadian tourists out shopping. within hours, a leader was in the hospital vomiting, dizzy and on a respirator to him him breathe. the two men were hitman from israel's secret service. the mission was to poison the hamas leader in retaliation for suicide bombings inside the country. a humiliating blunder for israel e. >> it was a disaster. it was as if it was part of a bad hollywood movie. >> jordan
flying and from lebanon, from hezbollah. the hamas organization in casa will send hundred. if we choose today between the option of allowing iran to become nuclear to the option of fighting ourselves, i think it is a clear message what we will do. i'm a question if we do it with the u.s. or without the u.s. assault over asking today. one of the main points of my book that i know many people here are informed about the middle east initiative a two state solution. for the last 20 years, we hear about a two state solution. you must finish the conflict and their resolution will be a palestinian state in judea and somalia and jerusalem. president obama adopted this approach and is calling upon us, the israelis to be the palestinian state can go back to 1967 lines. in my book i referred to a new paradigm. enough of the two state solution. it doesn't work. we traded for the last 20 years. we signed the oslo accord and they haven't received any peace. we tried with different engagements from god for anything for the long one that should be a three state solution and not two state solution. when
's an interesting aspect of the middle east that the qatarians are also close to hamas and have given money to them as well. >> absolutely. right now the qatarrys are playing an outsized role for a small country. the emir is trying to put himself and his country on the map diplomatically. they were very involved, of course, in libya. one of the first countries, arab countries in particular to support the rebel there is in the fight against colonel moammar qaddafi. so qatar is playing an important role now on a number of fronts. >> rose: eric, thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: eric schmitt from the "new york times." back in a moment. we'll talk to ehud olmert about how he sees israel today, president netanyahu, the coming election, iran and many other subjects. stay with us. >> rose: ehud olmert is here. he was prime minister of israel from 2006 to 2009. he left office under the shadow of allegations of corruption. in july he was acquitted of two major charges and found guilty of one minor one. some have suggested this paved the way for a political comeback. he has no
the palestinian bid for recognition at the u.n. as a way of undermining hamas and strengthening the pa, sort of last chance, i think, for the pa. what is your point of view on that? the united states has opposed the bid, basically, because israel opposes it, but would it really be in our interests to support it? i'm a little bit confused. i'm very supportive of the palestinians, but i'm a little bit confused about whether this is really in the palestinians' interests, although i certainly think it would be in their interest if they had the ability to use things like the international courts for human rights purposes. >> yeah. i think that the statehood issue is somewhat of a diversion. there are plenty of people in the world who would like to upgrade the palestinian status at the united nations as mainly a way to give them a measure of support, buck them up a little bit, because they're going through a long period of stasis in which they are powerless and divided and unable to control events in any way. it is a diversion anytime you go down a road that can't take you to what the essential eq
to help broker a ceasefire agreement between israel and hamas and the gaza strip. she also, the iranian nuclear threat and criticizes israel's decision to build homes on israeli occupied lands. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> i am somewhat overwhelmed, but i'm obviously thinking i should sit down. [laughter] i prepared some remarks for tonight, but then i thought maybe we could just watch that video a few more times. [laughter] and then the next time, i could count the hairstyles, which is one of my favorite pastimes. [laughter] i think i now know what it feels like to be one of haim's mighty morphin power rangers. [laughter] well, i guess we should expect nothing less from haim saban, who's a friend, a colleague, a mentor, an inspiration to so many of us here tonight. he certainly has always challenged me to make the most of america's place in the world and especially our close friendship with israel. and it is extremely humbling to be honored by the saban forum in front of so many americans and israelis whom i know and respect so greatly. and i am so appreciative of all
been eclipsed by hamas, it is strengthening its hand -- into strengthening its hand, that hamas had become the paramount force in the region. >> i believe this is on the anniversary of the vote for israeli acceptance in the un, wasn't it? 1948? exactly the same day. that was not a creation of israel. that was the partition resolution to create two states. that is the tragedy. that was a resolution 65 years ago that said there should be a jewish state and an arab state. the jews accepted, the arabs rejected. they started a war where they attacked israel, five arab countries invaded, and they thought israel would easily be destroyed. it wasn't, and we have had 60- plus years where israel has been a state and the palestinians, overrun by their own arab allies, or cap essentially in bondage. they never achieved statehood because every time it was offered, like in 1947, with the jewish state and a palestinian state, they always said no if there is a jewish state. it is the lack of acceptance of a jewish state for this entire time that has prevented the emergence of the palestinian state.
in the west bank celebrated the vote. and palestinians also celebrated in hamas-controlled gaza. >> it is a wonderful feeling, it is amazing. god willing, unity fatah and hamas will happen very soon in the near future. we will be brothers, and together we will destroy the israeli entity. god willing, we are going to victory, victory, victory. >> reporter: the vote was largely symbolic, but abbas called the vote a birth certifcate for the state of palestine. the palestinians say the u.n. backing will strengthen their hand, but israel says it will make talks every tougher. >> the truth is when the party is over and the people wake up tomorrow morning, they'll see nothing has changed. reality on the ground remains as is. the only way forward is not meaningless theatre at the united nations, the only way forward is to have meaningful peace talks. >> reporter: both israel and the u.s. suffered a huge blow diplomatically. >> a treaty that fulfills the aspirations of the palestinian people is through jerusalem and ramallah, not new york. we made it very clear to the palestinian leaders
. they are writing from the province of hama, where the rebels opened a new front a few days ago, pushing into the countryside, and they are pushing further, trying to reach the city of hama. the government is striking back with warplanes, shelling areas. up to 700 syrian refugees have not been registered, but others have been crossing the border illegally. the fact that there is no political settlement in sight, that means more refugees will be finding safe haven, especially since most of them say they expect the government to put up a strong fight. hama is a strategic town. >> what about health of the refugees, as winter really hits hard? >> it has been very difficult. according to turkish authorities, they are now hosting 150,000 refugees. those that are registered. others that have the means to survive have rented apartments or lived with relatives, and a new camp has been built for a new wave of refugees. they are also building a further six refugee camps, expecting to absorbent up to 50,000. people are cold, hungry, and it is not only a question of refugees. they might be more likel
visited the islands in august. >>> it's been more than a month since israel and hamas agreed to a cease fire in the gaza strip. more than 170 palestinians and six israelis died in the fighting. the violence left many traumatized particularly children. here's the report from gaza. >> reporter: one month into the cease fire resentment against israel runs deep in the gaza strip. militants are showing off the wreckage of a car in which a hamas commander was killed during an air strike and displaying pictures of women and children who were killed or injured in the violence. >> translator: this exhibition is meant to show the barbaric actions of israel against women and children. >> reporter: hamas leaded have viewed as a recession against israel. tens of thousands of their sp supporters gathered to celebrate. >> translator: the armed struggle against israel is our path to freedom. >> reporter: a new perfume also hit the stands selling more than 2,000 bottles. its named after the rockets fired against militants in israeli cities. >> translator: i'm proud our rockets can target israel in namin
lee myung bak visited the islands in august. >>> it's been more than a month since israel and hamas agreed to a cease fire in the gaza strip. six israelis died in the fighting. the vit lens violence left many traumatized particularly children. here's the report from gaza. >> reporter: one month into the cease fire resentment against israel runs deep in the gaza strip. militants are showing off the wreckage of a car in which a hamas commander was killed during an air strike and displaying pictures of women and children who were killed or injured in the violence. >> translator: this exhibition is meant to show the barbaric actions of israel against women and children. >> reporter: hamas leaded have viewed as a recession against israel. >> translator: the armed struggle against israel is our path to freedom. >> reporter: a new perfume also hit the stands selling more than 2,000 bottles. its named after the rockets fired against militants in israeli cities. >> translator: i'm proud our rockets can target israel in naming a perfume after them was a great idea. >> reporter: the violence l
time since hamas took control in 2007. it began going through the crossing on sunday for a private construction project. qatar says it will pay $400 million for reconstruction. by examining the wreckage of a russian jet that crashed, five killed, survivors seriously injured. it may have caused the plane to skid off of the runway. we have the latest. >> a harrowing scene. motorists dodging the debris of a russian airliner. remarkably, none of them were killed. the plane overshot the runway at the airport and crashed on the motorway. >> the plane touched down within the landing zone but for some reason was not able to stop within the landing strip and went at high speed and crashed into the main station, destroyed it, and continue to move outside of the safe zone. >> the cockpit ended up on the road. the rest went across the perimeter fence. they held an emergency crews. >> i feel so sorry for the victims. our sympathies go to the families of the dead. >> investigators believe that the brake system of the plane was faulty. this happened during the peak holiday travel season, and it d
conflict between israel and hamas. here we are, three careers later, at the end of another conflict between israel and hamas. what if anything in that region has changed since your visit in 20091. >> well the possibility of a two-state solution is more difficult now than it was then. it was very difficult then. the israelis and the palestinian authority. and it's ironic because both israel and the palestinian authority are opposed to hamas. they have that in common. hamas is a competitor. >> that's about the only thing they seem to have in common. >> but yet they're both taking steps that have the effect of bolstering hamas. that improve hamas' standing in the region and i don't think that's the way they're going to find a peaceful resolution here. >> the how would characterize this administration's handling of the statehood issue? >> well i agree with the president's position, the question now is, what happens after it occurs? and of course what we've seen is that the israelis have responded with an action of their own. that we also disagree with. that's moving them further apart. but in t
of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the first time in 37 years. he had never been to gaza in his life but after kissing the tarmac apparently sobbing as he did so khaled meshaal said gaza had always been in his heart. there to greet him were the al qassam brigades. named after an arab rebel leader killed by the british in the 1930s. 80 years on the fight for self- rule isn't over. and thousands turned out to watch meshaal's cavalcade crawl through gaza city just days after a war with israel which left around 160 palestinians dead. >> the second was when i was recovering from poison. i consider today my third birth, i ask god my fourth birth will be when we liberate all of palestine. >> reporter: it was after the arab israeli war of 1967 that meshaal fled from the occ
of hamas has visited the gaza strip for the first time after crossing the egyptian border. he was greeted by officials and by those supporting the cause as well. >> it was seen as the first of towards international acceptance of hamas. >> the united nations climate talks in doha i set to end today with chances slim that negotiators will find some form of agreement. >> some 200 countries have been participating, and delegates are struggling to agree on an extension to the kyoto deal to curb greenhouse emissions, which expire at the end of this year. >> tackling climate change through song -- a new approach for these environmental activists. the delegates gathered inside are not facing the music. there's been no progress towards reaching an agreement to reduce carbon emissions. this despite warnings that experts profess climate change is progressing faster than expected. >> every month we waste makes protecting the environment more expensive and increases the problems for the people whose lives have already been adversely affected. we have no time to lose. >> even germany, considered a lead
morsi for his role in things like the hamas-israel cease-fire which was announced the day before morsi announced his decree. >> they did that the day after sitting down with with secretary of state hillary clinton. >> he clearly, morsi clearly felt emboldened to take that step. what president obama in six telephone conversation with president morsi before the cease-fire, as you said secretary of state there in egypt. whether there was a wink and a nod or body language, we don't know but morsi took it he would have a free hand and i believe that's why he acted. >> we'll see what happens this saturday, the clock it ticking. six days to go. embassador john bolton, always good to see you. >> thank you. >> the fighting in syria's spilling into neighboring lebanon. take a listen here. you can hear the gunshots. the rocket-propelled grenades and more tar fire are in the streets. supporters of bashar al-assad exchanging gunfire. more than a dozen people have been killed, more than 60 wounded. >> as unrest in other parts of the world, europe, in spain, a developing conflict over medical workers
bombing in hamas. activists say the air strike on sunday killed at least 90 people. many were lining up to buy bread at the time. the activists said the bakery was targeted. the government said it was terrorists. turkish officials said at least 700 people from hamas province have crossed the border. more than half a million people have fled syria in more than two years of fighting. there was a quick visit to the capital by brahimi. we met with assad but the outcome of the meeting remains unclear. >> yet another attempt by syria's envoy to find way to end the war. brahimi met assad in damascus. it is not clear if he has a concrete plan but brahimi is trying to get an agreement on a transitional government. >> i've met president assad and we ex-changed views on the next steps to be taken to move forward. we also discussed the steps that i see can be taken to help the people come out of this crisis. >> any political solution that would save the regime is unacceptable. the political solution that is acceptable puts an end to killing of syrians. any solution that does not begin with assad st
. israel imposed a strict economic embargo when the palestinian group hamas took control of the territory. residents of gaza have endured restrictions on their travel and movement of medical supplies and other goods. shortages of fuel have caused power outages for up to 18 hours a day. militants in gaza and israeli forces fought for eight days in november before diplomats brokered a cease-fire. but hamas promise they'll they'll continue their armed struggle. some groups are even calling for more radical action. an official at the israeli defense department says they'll continue easing a blockade if the cease fire holds. >>> just as authorities in israel announced the indictment of former foreign minister avigdor lieberman. he faces charges of fraud and breach of trust. lieberman is accused of trying to promote a diplomat who relayed information to him about his political funding. he resigned two weeks ago after being informed of the charges. he said he would prove he's innocent. lieberman leads a far right party which has formed a coalition with benjamin netanyahu's likud party. lieberman
way change the negotiation or the balance between abbas or hamas in terms of the leader in the palestinian world? >> it's purely symbol victory. that may help him a little bit in his joust for power that he has going on with hamas. it does not change the situation on the ground between the palestinians and israel. i think this is really the decision announced by the government today to expand settlements particularly in the key parts of the eastern part of jerusalem in a large settlement block, it's very worrisome. the united states will have to criticize this. if they build those 3,000 housing settlements it effectively cuts off the northern part of the west bank from the southern part of the west bank. very worrisome if you try to negotiate a final peace deal. >> eliot: michael, i have not heard anybody that disagrees with the analysis there. that's these have an unique lick destructive play and role in the prospect of peace negotiation. what can we do after this vote? how can the president called prime minister netanyahu and say don't do it? this is a tough moment for
in exile, one of the founders of hamas, khalid meshaal, made a historic return today. the pomp and circumstance surrounding his visit underscored the organization's powerful influence among palestinians. cnn's fred pleitgen was there. >> reporter: he received a triumphal welcome when he entered gaza. tens of thousands of hamas fighters lined the street wearing ski masks and combat fatigues and flashing their weapons, including ak-47s and rocket-propelled grenades. the official reason why meshaal is here after never having been in gaza before is the 25th anniversary of the founding of hamas which the united states considers to be a terrorist organization. one thing you hear on every street corner is hamas is saying they are declaring victory against israel after the armed conflict that happened here about two years ago. now many here in gaza hail meshaal as an important figure. there are many in the u.s. and israel as well who say that this man is a very dangerous terrorist to -- who until this day does not acknowledge israel's right to exist, tom. >> thank you very much, fred.
israel and hamas militants. 138 countries voted yes, 41 on stained, nine voted no against giving them observer state status for israel and the united states. here's what suzanne rice said to the general assembly after the vote. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is why the united states voted against it. tonight's grand pronouncements will soon fade and the palestinian people will wake up tomorrow and find a little about our lives has changed. >> we have a member of the israel knesset is own the foreign affairs and defense committee. she joins me from tel aviv. thank you so much for being here. why do you think you were able to only get nine votes despite the lobbying efforts from the united nations? >> i think most countries unlike the u.s. had a deep misunderstanding as so what the vote was about. many countries, countries of good will, not those with a history against israel and would like to see the country disappear. countries especially in europe thought they were voting for something that would promote pea
no consequences from that. so if you're the palestinian authority or even more if you're hamas, the lesson that you learn is that ultimately, if you just keep the pressure on, the united nations will deliver israel for you. now, that's a badly misguided view, but when secretary clinton reacts the way she did just in the tape you showed, i think it sends the wrong signal to the palestinians and makes the negotiated outcome less likely, not more likely. >> and i want to ask you about what would have to happen, but i want a side bar on what happens at the united nations. as you described, despite objections from the u.s. and israel, they did get the status they were looking for and maybe they wanted more. why did that happen? >> well, i think because the united nations basically wasn't concerned enough about the consequences of this declaration by the general assembly to take adequate steps. you know, we faced this back in 1989 and 1990 and the george h.w. bush administration then secretary of state james baker said unequivocally, made a public statement that he would recommend to the preside
reaction at the general assembly than it had to do with hamas and the conflict there or anything that the united states may or may not be doing. that's what i'm most concerned about. >> eliot: there are domestic foundations to every foreign policy but this seems to be a step that uniquely puts the finger in the eye of the international community and makes it difficult to come back to the negotiating table. i'm mystified if you have hamas and abbas, he wants to make hamas the enemy and abbas the negotiating party, he does not seem to be turning to abbas as someone to play ball. and then the necessary next step to a two-state solution. >> this is what troubles me. net withnetanyahu, if he has a machiavellian idea, whether abbas is there or not, by beginning to construct on the very territory that most palestinians who are secularists believe should be part of a palestinian state. i don't understand why netanyahu thinks that he can force allies like great britain and france who just sided with him on gaza and the united states, and put him in a terrible predicament in the challenge
speech. there's no radical demon monsters out there. >> sean: morsi along with hamas that has in their charter the call for the destruction of israel and morsi and his government supported hamas in their recent attacks on israel. they've recently been meeting with the iranians, so you don't see that a radicalized islam i can state under morsi is a problem? >> jihaddists, radicals, those are everybody's enemy. it's not them. they've been fighting for 30 or 40 years. i keep telling you this, but this is just simply not true. anybody who knows the region knows this isn't the case. >> sean: you obviously don't know what you're talking about. >> thank you very much. >> the muslim brotherhood is a very radical organization. >> i mean, look. i understand islamic politics. i rode wrote a book about it. you can read it. the muslim brotherhood are considered wimps when it comes to radical brotherhood. >> this is why they're becoming very powerful and they have 70 offshoots including al-qaeda and hamas. >> that's a lie. >> sean: we've got to go. thank you. >> you are lying to your audie
invoice. since the creation of hamas with a visit by the terrorist group's long-time leader. he traveled to the area hamas has governed since 2007. the hamas leader called for the freedom of palestine, and said they wouldn't give up. the u.s. has listed him as a terrorist since 2003. >>> and secretary of state, hillary clinton, the violence is only getting worse there. more than 40,000 lives have been lost. cnn's arwa damon has more on the latest, just how bad things are getting for locals who are still trying to live their lives in the middle of a war zone. >> reporter: it is hard to fully absorb the scale of the devastation here, how entire buildings seem to have folded down upon themselves. and then one continues to see traces of the lives of the civilians that called these buildings home, like the clothing that is just hanging right there. or children's books, like this one, the pages of it that we picked up from the rubble. but this conflict can be surreal. just a couple of blocks away, the local barber shop is open, as are a handful of other stores. women crowd around us, eager to
of the remarks of hamas's political leader who said he will never recognize israel's right to exist. >> talks are going on now and we're working out issues. the most important is stopping the flow of iranian missiles and weapons into gaza. >> has there been progress? >> we're discussing is openly. most the weapons, whether they come from the libyans or sudanese pass through egyptian territory into gaza. if we can stop that we can do a tremendous amount towards reinforcing the cease-fire. the head 6 hamas was in gaza and talked about destroying the jewish state. there's no chance for negotiation. we're going to liberate tel aviv and get it from the paper mache model of a rocket. there's no better indicator of what we're dealing with with hamas than the speech by mashle. >> thank you so much for coming in. we'll continue to monitor the developments in the region. tha. >>> up negotiation, the supreme court steps into the debate over same-sex marriage. we'll ask our sunday group if a new constitutional right is in the making. ♪ the weather outside is frightful ♪ ♪ but the fire is so delight
: judy, i thought this had something to do with the deal that president morsi brokered between hamas and israel. maybe this is pay back. this has been in the works for a long time. >> exactly. that's why, melissa, if they cancel this order it would send a hugely negative signal just at a time when the united states is kind of hoping that somehow the egyptian government manages to hold its together. so far they are their own worst enemy. they're doing everything they can to screw things up, but, we still hope, we hope that they are going to prevail at least, at least president obama does. because the alternative is more violence and chaos. melissa: michael, from the point of view of optics this is very tough sell at a point we know egypt is supplying weapons to hamas. was on the other side with our ally, israel. to then be giving fighter jets to egypt seems bizarre? >> it is absolutely bizarre and it's inexcusable. it goes beyond just egypt's links to hamas. egypt has been actively flirting with not only hezbollah but with the islamic republic of iran. we really need to ask ourselves
and hamas. we do not know who has the real rights over the palestinian people. >> it has been a pleasure talking with you. i appreciate all of your thinking and your opinions. >> thank you, my pleasure. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> later tonight on c-span, we will also show you secretary of state hillary clinton's keynote address from the same event. >> so particularly, in light of today's announcement, let me reiterate that this administration, like previous administrations, has been very clear with israel, that these activities set back the cause of a negotiated peace. we all need to work together to find path forward in negotiations that can finally deliver on its two state solution. that must remain our goal. >> secretary of state clinton talks about the cease-fire between israel and palestine. israel opposes a plan to build new settlements and the political reality -- israel's plan to build new settlements, and the political reality in the middle east. that is tonight at 10:00 on c- spa
in gaza. senator kc --casey has said we must prevent hamas, israel has the right to set up a naval blockade, key weapons to hamas and responsibility to protect its homeland. hamas is a terrorist organization that denies israel's right to exist and indiscriminately fired thousands of rockets in at towns, is a proxy for iran and an impediment to peace in the region and he goes on to say israel's citizens deserve to live without fear. as we move forward we must do all we can to break this unbreakable bond and as he heads to a second term i have no doubt he will do that. join me in welcoming our friend senator robert casey. [applause] >> thanks so much for that introduction. i am honored to be here for so many reasons. to follow the chairman, always an honor. it -- time grateful for that but especially glad to be here today because i almost wasn't, not in a dramatic way. we were all set to have a meeting and a vote that would involve the debt ceiling. as you know, not much rises quickly in the senate anyway. there was a meeting called for 1:00 and a vote after that or so we thought. th
, particularly his role in helping to broker the cease-fire with gaza, with hamas, in gaza, do you trust morsi to keep the peace with israel. >> he has said repeatedly to americans and others who visit egypt he has every intention of upholding the peace and played a constructive role in helping achieve a cease-fire surrounding the recent fighting in gaza and we hope egypt will continue to play that kind of constructive role in the future. >> chris: immediately after the palestinians, a week or so ago, were voted nonmember observer status as a state, nonmember observer state saturdtatus in t u.n., netanyahu said, you'll go ahead for plans, just plans at this point, for a settlement on the west bank called e-1. we'll put up a map and show it. the map of the project which the obama administration says would drive a wedge into the heart of the palestinian west bank, possibly cut off east jerusalem from the rest of the west bank and my question is, will israel develop that little chunk, e-1, or are you using that as a bargaining chip, to say to the palestinians, look, you made trouble for us in the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 251 (some duplicates have been removed)

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